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Printer’s Alley

4 May

Tiffany M. Roberts

Between Church and Union Streets and Third and Fourth Avenues, North

Tiffany M. Roberts

Nashville is a growing city with a big southern loving heart that has an open mind.  The streets that make up this town are filled with excitement and endless possibilities for both the people that live here and those just passing through. For some Nashville could be could be considered the small town atmosphere with its loving heart and welcoming attitude, but it is with the endless possibilities of things to do day or night that gives it is richness and uniqueness that many ask for in a big city.

It is clearly evident that when thinking of Nashville it sings out loud with pride as the Music City home. With places such as Grand Ole Opry House, The Ryman Auditorium, The Tennessee Performing Arts Center (TPAC) and so many others, is the reason why music is at home within the city limits.  With most of these places the genre of country music definitely comes to mind, however Nashville is known for its multicultural atmosphere.

This multicultural atmosphere can be found lurking in the streets all over downtown, however there is one particular street that it can definitely be found on and that is Printer’s Alley. Printer’s Alley is located downtown between Church and Unions Streets and Third and Fourth Avenues, North.  One would recognize it because there is huge iron neon sign stretching across the streets. Printer’s Alley inherited its name because in the past there were many printing companies that were located on this street.  This area was the home to both The Tennessean and the Nashville Banner newspapers. Over the years as printing companies moved to new locations for various reasons, the area began to pick up on the music scene and offered a different form of entertainment and gained its reputation as the Men’s Quarter. These night clubs such as Rainbow Room, Black Poodle, and Voo Doo Lounge were several that offered entertainment in the form of burlesque dancers.  David “Skull” Schulman was at the time the owner of these nightclubs the Rainbow Room and the Black Poodle. Overall Printer’s Alley quickly became known as the dark alleyway and was the place where you could get anything.

Currently at night this alleyway comes to life with such places as Bourbon Street Blues and Boogie Bar, Ms. Kellie’s, The Brass Stables and several other clubs that occupied the area.  If one is curious and chooses to venture down this alleyway they might also want to check out Ms. Kellie’s, because it is claimed as one of the best Karaoke bars in Nashville. Printer’s Alley now features different genres of live music all the time and periodically it hosts bigger celebrities within its quarter, and it is now really know for it universal entertainment.

Tiffany M. Roberts

Tiffany M. Roberts

Tiffany M. Roberts

Tiffany M. Roberts

Tiffany M. Roberts

Tiffany M. Roberts

Tiffany M. Roberts

Sources:

Faragher, Scott. Nashville: Gateway to the South : An Insider’s Guide to Music City, U.S.A. Nashville, TN: Cumberland House, 1998. Print.

Metro Nashville Historical Commission. Footnotes Walking Tour of Downtown Nashville. Metro Nashville Historical Commission. Metro Historical Commission. Web. 01 May 2012. <http://www.nashville.gov/mhc/docs/historic/FOOTNOTESbrochure_COLOR.pdf&gt;.

“Nashville Scene.” King of the Night Skull Schulman and the Spledid Tawnery Past 22 Sept. 1994. Web.

“The Printers Alley.” The Printers Alley. Web. 01 May 2012. <http://www.theprintersalley.com/index.html&gt;.

Musica

4 May

Musica

By Ashley Douglas

Notorious for its booming music industry, Nashville certainly lives up to its nickname, “Music City.”  It would only be fitting that the heart of Nashville would feature an area known as, Music Row.  Music Row is a dedication to the city’s number one tourist attraction and is home to over one hundred music related businesses.

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Alan LeQuire’s sculpture, “Musica,” sits directly in the center of the Music Row roundabout, giving any mobile observer a 360 degree view.  “Musica” portrays nine nude figures dancing and celebrating.  “Musica” stands at a total of thirty-eight feet, with each figure measuring somewhere between fourteen to fifteen feet, making it one of the largest group sculptures in the United States.  LeQuire crafted each figure out of a combination of bronze and limestone.

The nine figures depicted in “Musica,” are all participating in a dance, something that goes hand in hand with music.  The composition of the statue is incredibly grandeur and celebratory and though it is not a sign or logo, “Musica,” operates similarly.  Adding “Musica” to Music Row functions as a visual icon and permanent tribute to an industry that continues to be economically significant to Nashville.

Not only is “Musica,” celebrating the significance of the music industry, it is also commemorating the racial diversity that Nashville entails.  LeQuire modeled the figures after a variety of races, inspired by live models of Caucasian, Hispanic, Asian, and African American decent and for this reason, the figures are depicted nude.  The nude figures caused several people to become uncomfortable, and in 2010 a group of individuals clothed figures.  LeQuire responded to the upset few by stating, “The work is entirely tasteful and not at all sexualized.”

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The location and symbolism of “Musica,” has caused it to become a significant part of Nashville’s design history.

Country Music Hall Of Fame

2 May

Country Music Hall Of Fame

222 5th Avenue South
Nashville, TN 37203

by BooMarie

In 1961 the Country Music Association announced the creation of the Country Music Hall of Fame.  They chose an all-star line-up with their first three inductees – Jimmie Rodgers, Hank Williams, and Fred Rose. In the Summer of 1997, fundraising started in order to move, build, and create Nashville’s new tourist destination.  While the Country Music Hall of Fame was in charge of identifying and preserving the evolution of the history and traditions in country music, it’s new “big stars” were technology and design.

 

 

 

In 1998, visions for this new destination started to take shape.  New innovations with technology began to form and the museum was more than willing to make the best of it.  So, what was so intriguing and different about this Nashville landmark?  Will Pinkston from the Tennessean explains, “A person would select a few oldies while walking through exhibits, then pick up a freshly “burned” CD on the way out.” But that is not all! Forty touch-screen panels were stationed throughout the museum, providing easy access to profiles of country personalities, significant dates and other important pieces of facts and data.  These innovations caught the eye of not only the Nashville community and thousands elsewhere, but these innovations were supported by great concept and research.

On April 8, 1998 the Tennessean, a local news source, reported with the headline,”Designer took country crash course.” So what did they mean and who was this designer? Ralph Appelbaum, previously known for his work at the William J. Clinton Presidential Library (2004), the Museum of the Portuguese Language (2006), The National World War I Museum (2006), the London Transport Museum (2007), and the Newseum (2008), rolled up his sleeves and metaphorically put on his cowboy hat to produce the most cutting edge creation Nashville had seen.

 

Photo by: The Washington Post

 

If you are familiar with Ralph Appelbaum, you are familiar with his rare ability to draw emotion from the passersby. “He knows, for instance, how to make people cry in public. He is perfectly capable of disarming viewers with displays of poignant beauty and promise, or overpowering them with graphic proof of tragedy and loss,” states Barbara Flanagan (2000). He is known for his consideration and acknowledgment of today’s museums and how they compete with other forms of leisure entertainment. As his reputation speaks for itself, it is understood that he doesn’t work in the field of museum exhibition design. He practically owns it. “By mixing the didactic material of museums with a good story line and a lot of flashy modern hardware, he all but invented ‘edutainment’.” – Bradford A. McKee.

 

“What’s a Museum: What he says it is. How Ralph Appelbaum built a monopoly in the field of exhibition design.” – Architecture Magazine, 2002

 

So, where did the inspiration and research for such an innovative museum come from? Of course, the environment surrounding. Researchers looked at a variety of interesting subjects including: country songs, general stores, classic cars, prisons, grain silos, and water towers. Appelbaum initially incorporated many of these elements directly into the design. Hence, the Hall of Fame’s Rotunda. It is shaped and inspired by none other than a grain silo. The signature “radio tower,” which projects from the museum’s top, resembles the WSM radio tower in tribute to the station which launched the one and only Grande Ole Opry.

 

Photo By: Ralph Appelbaum Associates

 

It is a simple but important equation. With the addition to the new location, novel design, and ingenious creativity the Country Music Hall of Fame became the new landmark to visit and quickly started to accumulate business, which later led to increased tourism for Nashville. Respectably, the understanding of how much it would produce in profit was secured early on. Many say Nashville needed this change and the community supported it. The Nashville Tourism Commission and the Metropolitan Convention Center Commission even believed in this expansion and approved early on by allocating $2 Million, paid in $500,000 increments to support the construction of Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum (Wanda Southerland).

 

“This is the first tourist-designated facility being built in Nashville in 20 years” – Kyle Young, Director of the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum.

 

Photo By: Ralph Appelbaum Associates

 

Well, how does the Country Music Hall of Fame fare today? Today, the Country Music Holds its own with both tourism and design. New exhibits are being added and innovative design is still being proven. While Nashville has stuck to its tradition of being the home for grand tunes, modernism in design has been and probably always be the key to promoting education – or – edutainment from the Country Music Hall of Fame.

 

Sources:

http://www.tennessean.com
http://www.architectmagazine.com
nashvillecitypaper.com

Hot Diggity Dogs

27 Apr

Hot Diggity Dogs

614 Ewing Avenue
Nashville, TN 37203

by Erin Crissey Lord

As I approach the motley-colored building on Ewing Avenue, I am first greeted by the happy, smiling faces of a pair of hotdogs decked out in hats and cowboy boots. The logo is cheery, welcoming and more importantly, telling me that something delicious and immersed in Nashville flare is waiting for me inside. Bigger than a hot dog stand, yet smaller than a bistro, the shop looks like a human-sized designer dog house . The tidy two-story brick building is painted, trimmed in teal and topped with a red tin roof. Obviously, by the size of the line stretching out into the parking lot of this local hot dog boutique, I am not the only patron to be seduced by quirky decor and the promise of a gourmet dog.

The line moves with amazing speed, and I am shocked that, within six minutes of my arriving and standing in a parking lot line full of hungry dog aficionados, I am already walking into the little brick house at 614 and about to give my order.

The heady smells of grilled meats, spicy sausages and sautéed onions are the first to greet me. The dense tang of brown mustard, a waft of bacon, a tinge of pickle; they beacon me forward as my eyes behold the menu all hot dogs must dream of starring in: top quality meats, gourmet toppings and home-made slaws. I am acutely aware at this moment that Hot Diggity Dogs isn’t your average, curb-side hot dog cart.

Like all great local businesses, I heard about the tempting fare at Hot Diggity Dogs long before I had an opportunity to visit the establishment. Many high profile foodie reports, upscale food blogs and loyal fan votes for “Best in Nashville” had tipped me off to the quiet little hot dog boom on the other side of town. Owners Layla Vartanian and Gayle Davis have created the perfect mix of big city flavor served up with down-home fun. Layla; Chicago veteran, Hot Dog Priestess, collector of fine relishes. Gayle; Southern beauty, Bratwurst Charmer, the secret behind the slaw. It is perhaps, this bipolar north/south partnership that makes Hot Diggity the premier Nashville Hot Dog shop.

Opening in Nashville nine years ago, Hot Diggity Dogs has mastered the art of growing a successful business with the importance of staying connected to their customers. Juggling customer demand while within a tiny space and not just serving the public, but creating a loyal customer base to spread the word on the quality of your product isn’t an easy task. However, these ladies have taken customer appreciation to a whole new level. Hot Diggity recently gave away over a thousand of their masterpiece dogs during a frequent buyer promotion. A reward to those fans who have helped them grow.

The Nashville Dog: Vienna 100% beef dog, yellow mustard, diced onions, Layla’s specialty home made slaw, a few slices of Persian cucumber and finished with a pickle spear

The Nashville Chicago Dog: Vienna 100% beef dog, yellow mustard, diced onions, fresh tomato, spicy sport peppers, celery salt, a pickle spear and the tried and true secret to an amazing Chicago Dog – that nuclear green relish made especially by Vienna

Car-o-bama Dog: Vienna 100% beef dog, yellow mustard, diced onions, Gayle’s specialty home made slaw, a generous scoop of meaty chili and topped with diced onions and cheese

Vienna Brand 100% beef hot dogs and beef and pork sausages lay the foundation work for the carnivorous dog, however turkey and even vegan-friendly meatless dogs are available. Buns range from traditional white to wheat, hoagie style and even a bun-free lettuce wrapped dog are options. Other delicious state contenders include the New York Dog, California Dog, Texas Dog and even a Boston Dog topped with sweet and tangy baked beans. Or I could go with the featured special: The Hollywood Dog – wrapped in bacon. Add to this already tempting menu a myriad of Italian sausages and sliced beef, brats, Polish sausages and the bevy of krauts, grilled peppers, spices and the tongue tingling pepper-carrot-olive chop also known as giardiniera.

Perhaps staying connected to your customer is an easy job to do, when an owner is the person taking your order. “What would you like, Hun?” I stare at the menu doe eyed, unable to decide. Gayle offers a few helpful suggestions, and I nod in agreement – it all sounds delicious. I finally manage to squeak out “Bratwurst”. “Excellent choice!” she sings with a smile, “I personally like mine with some extra grilled onions tucked in under the sauerkraut, would you like to try it?” Absolutely. I watch as my fresh brat is split and begins to sizzle on the grill. The ladies behind the counter work at amazing speed, frying up pickles, packing dogs and simultaneously throwing out “Thank you, Hun” with a wink and a smile, to customers picking up orders. My dog is ready and so am I. As, I take a bite two thoughts enter my brain: what took me so long to try out the tiny dog shack? And, I have found hot dog nirvana!

I’ve since been back numerous times to little brick house on Ewing. It’s not just the fabulous food that brings me back each time, the ladies of Hot Diggity make each person that walks through their door feel genuinely appreciated and welcomed. “That’s my job!” chirps Gayle, “You have a choice of where you spend your dollar, I want you to be glad that you chose to come to us. We appreciate your patronage and we want to make sure you know it!” As more and more “regulars” pass through the door, it’s clear that Gayle takes this motto to heart. “Are we having the Nashville Dog again today Mr. Brenner, or are we trying something new?” “Surprise me Darlin’!” He yells, “Any of your dogs are a great dog, for this old dog!” I couldn’t agree more.

http://hotdiggitydogstn.com/

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Becker’s Bakery

27 Apr
Becker's Bakery

Donelson Location

Becker’s Bakery

2543 Lebanon Pike
Nashville, TN 37214

by Josh Rowe

Founded in 1925, Becker’s Bakery has been a part of the Nashville landscape since before the second world war. Initially opened in one location by Frank Anderson Becker at 12 Avenue South in Nashville and the second was opened in Old Hickory by Ed Becker (later moved to Donelson), the story of this bakery has been one of both change and continuity, stories of overwhelming success and heart-breaking failure and a story that is above all about a family and their commitment to quality made goods. They are committed to tradition in not only their goods, but also their aesthetic. Given that their clientele stretches back 81 years in my family alone, the reliability that tradition breeds seems to be a key to staying open for 87 years in a business that sees over half close in the first year.

Donelson

The consistency isn’t just in the rolls however. When the walls were painted yellow instead of blue some of their veteran customers were sure to let them know how the change made them feel. Even something as progressive as them allowing payment by check in 1996 was met with some resistance. Obviously they weren’t opposed to more diverse payment option, but the customers have literally grown up with this business and that is bond formed over decades. Though some change has occurred over time of course, the name for instance was originally Standard Baking Company for the Nashville location and Modern Baking Company at the Old Hickory/Donelson location. The bakeries have also been passed through the generations at least three times at each location. Sadly the advent of the package goods style of bakery found within your local mega-mart lead to the closing of the Nashville location on January 6th, 2004.

We can’t compete against a $3 pie… people aren’t willing to drive an extra 15 minutes to get a better product

Becker’s of Denelson has managed to adapt to the ever changing market better though. Raymond Becker and his wife Carolyn have managed to run a successful business in spite of the growth of multiple shopping centers around them. Both stores began from the same recipe book as well, so even though the one location is no longer around their legacy carries on. When the Nashville location closed Donelson received and influx of customers as well. People weren’t willing to stop having their Birthday cakes made by Becker’s just as they had for fifty years in the case of one customer. Kathrine Fletcher has been a customer for over 60 years and she has “got her my girls a cake for their birthday every year from here and my youngest just had her 52nd birthday” and if you ask Carolyn Becker then you’ll quickly find out that there is no reason that should change anytime soon.

Where the Magic Happens

Sources:
http://beckersbakery.com
Nashville Scene
Tennessean
Interview with Kathrine Fletcher

Grand Ole Opry: Opry Shops

20 Apr

By Aaron Johnson

The Grand Ole Opry is Nashville’s own piece of history, being a one-of-a-kind weekly stage and radio show since 1925. The Opry stores have been a big part of the attention the Opry gets from tourism. Though not all Nashville tourists visit the Opry itself, a good number of them visit the Opry stores around Nashville in search of souvenirs that represent the heart of county music.  The stores themselves are designed to attract customers who enjoy the look and feel of country music, and bring visitors to the Opry itself. The Opry has three main stores around Nashville which serve as a reminder to tourists to visit the cities most unique radio show and theater.

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